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Summer Retreat Completes

The Annual Summer Retreat 2014, which held for three months at Thrangu Tashi Yangtse Monastery in Namo Buddha, completed successfully on October 8.
 
On this very day, addressing gaye, khenpos, lamas, and monks went for circumambulation of Namo Buddha stupa. After the circumambulation, every gathered in the shrine hall to perform, long life prayers, which completes the retreat.
 
On October 7 evening, a special program was organised, where Khenpo Losal, Khenpo Sherab Phuntsok, Khenpo Karma Phuntsok, and Khenpo Karma Gendun gave teachings about various subjects; like importance of entering to sangha community, Dharma in our daily life, benefit of great devotion and hard working. The evening was conclude with Shedra monks performing debate in traditional way.

Yarney, the Summer Retreat Begins

July 12, 2014

The three-month long summer retreat has begin at Namo Buddha Thrangu Tashi Yangtse Monastery. 

Early this morning, around 5 am, the monks gathered in the main shrine hall to do regular Sojong and  take retreat vows. This year, there are 68 Bikshus (Gelong) and 80 shramanas (Getsuls) staying in retreat.
During this whole retreat period, there will be daily Sojong, retreat prayers, and evening prayers. The retreatants's  lunch will be served in begging bowls and they will not take any solid food after lunch, no dinner.
Click the <LINK> to know more about summer retreat, and its importance and benefits.
 

Special Health Camp For The Sangha at Namo Buddha

By Wangchuk Tenzin

With view to mainly helping the many monks who suffer from gastric illnesses and also other general health issues, a medical camp was sponsored and organized by our own benefactor and lotsawa Michele Martin.

During this health camp, doctors, a nurse, and a lab technician are brought from CIWEC Clinic in Kathmandu, which is famous worldwide for taking care of foreigners, especially trekkers and tourists, in Nepal. We have also had our volunteer doctor Ramin here for the past two years.

In addition to organizing the treatment of the monks, we have also been organizing a special public talk by the doctors to educate the monks about diseases and ways to prevent them. As it is said, "Prevention is better than cure."

During the last night, the selected topic for the talk was general hygiene and hepatitis. Dr. Rashila started the talk by explaining the improvements she has seen in the monks’ health, especially related to gastric problems. She said that this time most of the monks had problems more similar to the general population. They were suffering from respiratory problems, minor skin diseases, some infections and stomach problems, headaches, shoulder and back pain. Without too much trouble, she counseled, many of these illnesses could be avoided by some regular exercise, a good sitting posture, and drinking 3 liters of water per day during hot weather.   

She also expressed concern about the hygiene and cleanliness of small monks, i.e., proper hand washing, not sharing razors, towels, soap, and clothes, by which skin related diseases can easily spread.  

In speaking about hepatitis, she explained that it is a fatal disease as your liver is attacked and weakened. It is very communicative in nature and the virus can survive outside your body for six days. It can be transferred through blood, unprotected sexual intercourse, injections, and so on, in the same way as HIV/ AIDS is transferred. The difference is that hepatitis can be transferred 100 times quicker than AIDS.

Dr. Rashila advised that anyone suffering from Hepatitis B should not take other medications without consulting a doctor and informing her or him that you have the disease, because many of the medicines can give more work to the liver and kidneys, which is not good when you have hepatitis.

The talk was concluded with questions from monks about general health problems and  hepatitis. After the initial consultations and testing during the clinic, the monks who need it are referred to specialists and to labs for further care and testing.